Are Smart Watches The New Smart Phone?

metal industry, shanghai metal corporation, Stainless, Steel, technology

Remember back to when you played as a child: talking into your wristwatch communicator Knight Rider style. Now these fantasies have been realized in the new wearable computing innovation.smartwatch1

A torrent of new smart watches from small startup companies, including Pebble and MegaWatch, hit the market in 2013, and big companies have arrived as well: Sony, Samsung, LG, and Qualcomm all offer smart watches. Rumor has it that Apple will be joining the crowd later this year. And Google recently launched a new operating system, called Android Wear, that’s designed specifically for wearable-technology devices. LG, Samsung, and Motorola, among others, are making smart watches that run on this new OS. 

But, are mainstream consumers ready for smart watches? According to a Parks Associates survey released in June of this year, just 4 percent of U.S. broadband households say they are very likely to purchase a smart watch in the next 12 months.

Most of the watches on the market today are what you might call “fashionably challenged” – they simply aren’t attractive enough to entice the masses. Moreover, Buzzfeed reports that lefties have been left out of the design, with humorous revisions to the current models proposed.

smartwatchtweet

Motorola has bucked this trend, and has gone high class with a stainless steel casing and Horween leather bands, bringing a level of style other leather and cheaper metal options the other manufacturers had yet to try.

motosmartwatch2

If you would like see stainless steel design from its inception, Shanghai Metal Corporation manufactures the stainless steel used for designer items like watches. As an ISO 14001 (International Quality Management System) Company and recipient of the “Star Enterprise Award,” Shanghai Metal Corporation prides itself on exceeding international standards of quality and reliability. We guarantee the best prices, quality support, and fast delivery. To find out more, please visit our Website,, WordPress, LinkedIn , Twitter , Facebook  and Instagram. Or you could try our new mobile app by scanning our QR code. Moreover, we sell directly from Alibaba , EC21 and Tradekey.

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Sources: Consumer Reports, EN Gadget, Buzzfeed

 

Siobhan R.// SMC Editor

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Flash Back Friday

Construction, Steel

tyne bridge

It is exciting to know that there are some early iron and steel bridges still in use today. The world’s first cast iron bridge was built at Coalbrookdale, Telford, England, in 1779 and is still in use today carrying occasional light transport and pedestrians.

Until 1840 the construction material used was either cast iron or wrought iron or a combination of both. In the early 1800s cast iron was beginning to be replaced by wrought iron and many of the early railway bridges were built of riveted wrought iron construction.

It was not until the late 1800s that steel began to replace wrought iron and by the early 1900s wrought iron was no longer available, as worldwide, steel makers had moved to producing carbon steel, a much more reliable material.

Chronology

1857 Weichsel Bridge, Dirscham, East Prussia was the first large wrought iron girder railway bridge to be built in Germany.
1863 Menangle Viaduct, New South Wales, Australia is the oldest existing railway bridge in Australia. It has two wrought iron riveted box girders and originally had three equal spans of 49.4m. However, these spans have now been halved by the addition of intermediate piers to allow the bridge to accommodate heavier loading.
1870 Kymijoki railway bridge, Koria, Finland, was the first 3-span steel truss bridge built in Finland. Originally for a railway, this riveted bridge was converted to carry road traffic in 1923, and is still in use today as a footbridge.
1883 Brooklyn Bridge, USA, was the first steel wire and steel bridge to be built in the world.
1884 Garabit Viaduct, St.Flour, France, built by Gustav Eiffel is one of the first wrought iron truss arch bridges to be built in the world.
1888 Tenryugawa Bridge – First railway bridge built in Japan using steel.
1890 First major steel cantilever railway bridge in the world, over the Forth near Edinburgh, Scotland.
1897 Eitaibashi Bridges – First steel highway bridge built in Japan, used 690Mpa steel developed for navy vessels.

Most of these structures are still in use today.

In the mid 1900s the use of welding brought major changes to the steel fabrication industry. In some countries however it took until the 1960s before rivets became obsolete and bolted and welded construction took over.

From the 1930s many of the large structures being built were of steel. Notable examples include:

  • 1931 – George Washington Suspension Bridge, USA.
  • 1932 – Sydney Harbour Bridge, Australia.
  • 1936 – Hangang Bridge, Seoul, Korea – Tied-arch with 6 spans of 63.5m (totaling 381m).
  • 1937 – Golden Gate suspension bridge, San Francisco, USA.

From the 1950s steel has become more competitive for highway bridges in the medium span range 45m – 100m. Today the competitiveness of steel is being realised over all span ranges, as steel makers and fabricators work closely together. The introduction of new high strength steels, modern fabrication workshops (with automatic welding girder lines), and the availability of very large cranes for handling and erection are some of the reasons why steel is so competitive.

Cited: WorldSteel

Ashley G. // Editor SMC

In Economic Turmoil, Environment Remains Key

Stainless, Steel, Sustainability

Even during periods of economic turmoil, the environment remains a key issue for our world.

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By 2050, it is estimated that there will be two billion more people living in the world’s cities which, according to experts, will mean that world construction will grow by more than 70% and reach $15 trillion by 2025, outpacing global GDP. Part of the solution is to build with steel – 50% of steel is used in construction. With four people per house, this will mean providing 1,427 homes every hour, with most of them needed in Asia and Africa. How can such growth be made sustainable?

As most people are aware, steel is used in so many important applications, from bridges and other large constructions, trains and rail lines to industrial machinery, housing, offices, hospitals, cars, buses and bicycles, to name but a few examples. Steel delivers a number of unique environmental benefits, such as product longevity, recyclability, easy transportation and less raw material wastage. In addition, steel offers architectural and design flexibility due to its inherent strength, which allows large span distances and curves to be easily incorporated into designs.

Perhaps best of all, steel is 100% recyclable, without losing any of its properties or strength, and thus reducing the solid waste stream, which results in saved landfill space and the conservation of natural resources. Indeed, more steel is recycled each day than any other material. Even better, the steel industry as a whole has dramatically improved its energy efficiency over the past 30 years, cutting energy consumption by 50% per tonne of steel produced and substantially reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, also per tonne of steel.

The industry is always looking for ways to improve, and to that end a project is in place in the United States that explores the possibility of replacing carbon with hydrogen in blast furnaces. In addition, ULCOS, which stands for Ultra–Low Carbon Dioxide(CO2) Steelmaking, is a consortium of 48 European companies and organisations from 15 European countries that have launched a co-operative research and development initiative to enable drastic reduction in CO2 emissions from steel production. The consortium consists of all major EU steel companies, energy and engineering partners, research institutes and universities and is supported by the European Commission. The aim of the ULCOS programme is to reduce today’s CO2 emissions by at least 50%.

From a human health perspective, steel frames have proven ideal for the ‘healthy home’ concept. The incidence of asthma and sensitivity to chemicals is on the increase and steel frames have been used to achieve allergen-free and dust-free interiors. This requires techniques such as special sealing around windows, moisture barrier systems in the walls, extensive insulation, and whole house ventilation systems. Steel frames retain their original dimensions, which is a major factor in maintaining effective long-term sealing.

Steel is already being used to help manufacture lighter, more fuel-efficient vehicles as well as renewable energy infrastructure including wind turbines, solar installations, smart electric grids and energy-efficient housing and commercial buildings. Its economic benefits include its quick construction off-site, which means less site disturbance and waste, more usable floor space, e.g. thinner floors allowing for more stories in a building, the flexibility to re-configure buildings and steel has a long life with low maintenance, plus energy efficiency for lower operating costs.

Sited: WorldSteel

Ashley G. // Editor SMC

What Makes Stainless Steel a Sustainable Material?

Stainless, Steel, Sustainability

Sustainable

 

People

The material, in its use or in its production process, respects
the human being, especially in terms of health and safety.
A sustainable material does not harm the people working
to produce it, or the people who handle it during its use,
recycling and ultimate disposal.
Stainless steel is not harmful to people during either its
production or use. A protective layer forms naturally on all
stainless steels because of the inclusion of chromium. The
passive layer protects the steel from corrosion – ensuring a
long life. As long as the correct grade of stainless is selected
for an application, the steel remains inert and harmless to the
people who handle it and the environment.
These characteristics have made stainless steel the primary
material in medical, food processing, household and catering
applications.

Planet

The emission footprints of the material, especially those related
to carbon, water and air, are minimised. Reuse and recyclability
are at high levels. The material has low maintenance costs and
a long life, both key indicators that the impact of the material
on the planet is at the lowest levels possible.
The electric arc furnace (EAF), the main process used to
make stainless steels, is extremely efficient. An EAF has a low
impact on the environment in terms of both CO2 and other
emissions. The EAF is also extremely efficient at processing
scrap stainless, ensuring that new stainless steel has an
average recycled content of more than 60%.
Stainless steels are easily recycled to produce more stainless
steels and this process can be carried on indefinitely. It is
estimated that about 80% of stainless steels are recycled at
the end of their life. As stainless steel has a high intrinsic
value, it is collected and recycled without any economic
incentives from the public purse.

Profit

The industries producing the material show long-term
sustainability and growth, provide excellent reliability and
quality for their customers, and ensure a solid and reliable
supply-chain to the end consumer.
Choosing the right stainless steel grade for an application
ensures that it will have low maintenance costs, a long life and
be easy to recycle at the end of that life. This makes stainless an
economical choice in consumer durables (such as refrigerators
and washing machines) and in capital goods applications (such
as transportation, chemical and process applications).
Stainless steels also have better mechanical properties than
most metals. Its fire and corrosion resistance make stainless
a good choice in transportation, building or public works such
as railways, subways, tunnels and bridges. These properties,
together with stainless steel’s mechanical behaviour, are of
prime importance in these applications to ensure human
beings are protected and maintenance costs are kept low.
Stainless also has an aesthetically pleasing appearance,
making it the material of choice in demanding architectural
and design projects.

Taking into account its recyclability, reuse, long life, low
maintenance and product safety, the emissions from the
production and use of stainless steels are minimal when
compared to any other alternative material. A detailed and
precise analysis of the sustainability of stainless steel makes
the choice of stainless a logical one. This might explain why,
as society and governments are becoming more conscious of
environmental and economic factors, the growth in the use of
stainless steel has been the highest of any material in the world.

Sited: WorldStainless

Ashley G. // Editor SMC

New Times Call For New Solutions

Stainless, Steel, Sustainability

LCA

It is time the world starts to look at the larger picture.  The following facts may lead you to question yourself or someone else during your next decision phase. We must remember that costs are not only those we see in the direct manufacturing of a product but also hidden in the use and recycling phases.

Key facts:

  • Life cycle assessment (LCA) is vital for the future. Environmental regulations that only regulate one phase (the use phase) of a product’s life cycle can create unintended consequences, such as increased CO2 emissions.
  • One example of this is vehicle exhaust or tail pipe regulations which encourage the use of low density materials which are more CO2intensive to produce.
  • LCA considers production, manufacture, the use phase and end-of-life recycling and disposal. Life cycle thinking leads to immediate environmental benefit.
  • In addition to CO2, LCA assesses other impacts such as resource consumption, energy demand and acidification.
  • LCA is easy to implement, cost effective and produces affordable and beneficial solutions for material decision-making and product design.
  • Worldsteel developed one of the first global sector databases for life cycle inventory data and invests to keep it current.

 

Cited: World Steel

Ashley G. // Editor SMC

We All Know About Apps But Do You Know About The Applications Of Alloy Stainless Steel?

Steel

ASTM International is one of the largest standards development organizations in the world. It is a trusted source for technical standards for stainless steel as well as other materials, products and systems. Most customers demand ASTM standard for steel products to ensure quality standards are met. Our SMC Stainless Steel meets ASTM standards every time.

Many stainless steel customers are looking for alloy stainless steel products. Below is a list of common applications provided in a simple table for your convenience.

Stainless Strip

 


Types of Stainless Steel Applications:


 

Types of applications:
High temperature Alloy Description
304H Alloy 304H stainless is probably the world’s most common stainless steel.
309 Alloy 309 stainless is best known for high temperature service.
310 Alloy 310 stainless, like 309, is best known for high temperature service.
446 Alloy 446 stainless is a high chromium ferritic stainless steel.
High strength 304H Alloy 304H stainless is probably the world’s most common stainless steel.
High corrosion-resistant 309 Alloy 309 stainless is best known for high temperature service.
310 Alloy 310 stainless, like 309, is best known for high temperature service.
317L Alloy 317L stainless is a low-carbon stainless steel.
321/321H Alloy 321 stainless is an austenitic stainless steel that contain stabilizing elements.
347/347H Alloy 347 stainless is an austenitic stainless steel that contain stabilizing elements.
446 Alloy 446 stainless is a high chromium ferritic stainless steel.
904L Alloy 904L stainless is a high alloy austenitic product.
High abrasion-resistant 317L Alloy 317L stainless is a low-carbon stainless steel.
410 Alloy 410 stainless is a martensitic stainless steel with high mechanical properties.

 Ashley G. // Editor SMC

“Clean Me” – Stainless Steel

Steel

Grain stainless

Stainless Steel is known for its ability to be a clean surface that resists corrosion and rust. Because of this stainless steel is a popular choice in kitchens and bathrooms. If you’ve had stainless steel around in your home for very long, you know that it has the potential to live up to its name. Dirt, dust and grime, however, put stainless steel at risk for corrosion and rust. Luckily, it responds well to cleaning, as long as certain rules are followed. In general, you want to start with the basics, and work your way up from there as needed.

Just like wood, steel also has a grain. These are the very faint striations that can be found on the surface of your appliance. An entire sheet of steel will have the same direction grain. That said, an appliance will usually have other steel pieces attached, such as handles and knobs. These other pieces may have a different direction grain, so make sure you are aware of this.

Will your appliance be ruined if you do not clean in the direction of the grain? Nope. Nothing dramatic will happen! Only that If you wipe perpendicular to the grain, more cleaning residue (mixed with any grime already on the steel) may get deeper into the tiny little crevices of the grain.

There are a few different methods that can be used to clean your stainless steel


No. 1


 

Routine cleaning can be accomplished by using warm water and a cloth. This is the least risky option for cleaning stainless steel, and honestly just plain water works to clean in most situations. Dry with a towel or cloth to prevent water spots. This is really important, since minerals in water can leave marks on stainless steel. Wipe in the directions of the polish lines for best and most beautiful results. Microfiber cleaning cloths can be a great option to use when cleaning stainless steel because they do a great job of absorbing all of the water without scratching the surface.

 


No. 2


For cleaning that needs more power, mild detergent and warm water can do a great job without damaging your stainless steel. A drop of mild dish detergent and warm water is often all you need to get tougher dirt off of your stainless steel. You can start with a small sink of warm water with a few drops of dish soap. You can also have a small drop of dish soap on a cloth. Add warm water to the cloth and rub the dish soap to suds up your cleaning cloth. Wipe down the dirty area. After you’ve finished washing away the dirt, make sure you rinse the surface thoroughly to prevent staining and spotting. It is important to towel dry to prevent water spots which can be caused by minerals in water.


No. 3


Fingerprints are one of the biggest complaints about stainless steel, but can be taken care of by using glass cleaner or household ammonia. Personally, I prefer glass cleaner. No matter what you decide to use, spray the cleaner on a microfiber cloth. You can spray directly on the stainless steel, but may end up with drips, or wasting a lot of cleaner that wasn’t needed. Wipe the stainless steel area gently in a circular motion to remove the finger print. Repeat as needed. Rinse thoroughly and towel dry. There are some newer types of finishes for stainless steel that resist fingerprints You may consider this a necessity if your pint-sized helpers leave their mark on your stainless steel appliances.


No. 4


 

If you have had staining or scratching, or need to polish your stainless steel, a stainless steel cleaner may be a good option. Some of these cleaners and polishes can help minimize scratching and remove stains. They also can polish surfaces nicely. Read the directions on the stainless steel cleaner and test in an inconspicuous spot. Be sure to rinse thoroughly and towel dry.

 

See your website for more stainless steel applications by clicking here.

Cited: About Home

Ashley G. // Editor SMC

STEEL – a Sustainable Future Ahead

Uncategorized

steel_cans_0Steel is essential to the modern world, and its use is critical in enabling man to move towards a sustainable future. Whether in lighter, more efficient vehicles or renewable energy generation, steel is a fundamental part of a greener world. Steel is also necessary for new, highly efficient power stations and the construction of smart electrical grids, transport infrastructure development, energy-efficient residential housing and commercial buildings.

More than 1.6 billion tonnes of steel are produced every year.

Currently, 45% of steel is produced and used in mainland China. There will be continuing growth in the volume of steel produced, particularly in developing areas such as Latin America, Asia, Africa and the Indian sub-continent, where steel will be vital in raising the welfare of developing societies. In these regions, more than 60% of steel consumption will be used to create new infrastructure.

 

 


Energy efficiency

In the last 50 years, the steel industry has reduced its energy consumption per tonne of steel produced by 60%. However, due to this dramatic improvement in energy efficiency, it is estimated that there is little room for further improvement on the basis of existing technology. Keeping total global CO2 emissions at the current level or better depends on the development and introduction of radical new steelmaking technologies with a lower carbon footprint. Many of the technologies that are being researched are associated with carbon capture and storage (CCS), which will require government and public support for implementation.

 


Recycling


 

A critical element in reducing the carbon emissions from the steel life cycle is to optimise the recycling of steel. Steel is an almost unique material in its capacity to be infinitely recycled without loss of properties or performance. This, in combination with a long history of significant efforts to increase recycling rates, has resulted in steel leading the recycling statistics, for example in cars and cans. Policies can provide further support for recycling by placing emphasis on recyclability and design for dismantling.

Cited: World Steel Association

Ashley G. // Editor SMC

The Look Is… Everything.

Steel

Mirror Fruit Bowl

 

Stainless Steel Mirror Sheet also referred to as a No.8 Finish, represents the smoothest of surfaces. As such, the finish has no grain and high reflective quality similar to that of a glass mirror. Utilizing micro-abrasive substances, we can provide such stainless steel sheet finishes as well as a guarantee of superior quality and prompt delivery.

Shanghai Metal Corporation is a company which is engaged in the manufacture and supply of a wide range of metal products such as Mirror Stainless Steel Sheets, which are used in a wide range of industries for various applications, and are currently high on demand in the market. These sheets are rust proof, reasonably priced and are exported to customers all over the globe.These sheets also have a very sturdy make and they are available in a range of sizes, shapes and thicknesses.

Click on the link to see a complete overview of this superior product available at SMC, don’t fall behind on the latest trend: http://goo.gl/ZWpOAP 

mirror steel

Ashley G. // Editor SMC

Are Dreams Becoming Reality?

Uncategorized

3D printer

Three-dimensional printers are expanding their repertoire every day. Now researchers around the world are using the technology to manufacture structural steel and metal components. Arup, headquartered in London, recently announced that it has developed a method to 3D print complex structural steel components for construction projects in a manner that reduces material cost and waste. Salomé Galjaard, a senior designer in Arup’s Amsterdam office, notes that the process can achieve the fluid shapes and complex geometries that architects often desire—and more structurally efficient components.

“It could be a great source of inspiration and could result in completely different building types,” says Salomé  “Your imagination is really the limitation with this.”

While Arup and the ESA are printing structural metal products, researchers at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), in Germany, are using 3D laser lithography to print micro-trusses and micro-shell structures from ceramic material, which is then coated by aluminum oxide for increased strength. These micro-scale products are less dense than water, yet stronger on a strength-to-weight ratio than some forms of steel.

“It has been a longstanding effort to create materials with low density but high strength,” the researchers wrote in a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

After studying the composition of wood and bone, which generally have high tensile strength because of their porous composition, the team developed honeycomb-shaped microstructures that achieved the research objectives: They were lighter than 1,000 kilogram per cubic meter (62.4 pounds per cubic foot), or the density of water, and could withstand 280 megapascals (40,610 pounds per square inch), making it stronger than some forms of steel.

Although computer simulations had indicated that such materials could be created, the tools to develop them at the “scale of a human hair” only came to being recently, according to an article from The Conversation. But KIT researchers used a new laser system from Nanoscribe, a spin-off company of KIT, to make it a reality. Lead researcher Jens Bauer told The Conversation that “this is the first experimental proof that such materials can exist.” Nanoscribe’s system is currently limited to objects that are tens of micrometers in size. Despite additive manufacturing’s advances and potential for fabricating structural metal products, Arup’s Galjaard doesn’t expect the technology to replace traditional manufacturing soon.

“It’s fantastic and it’s beautiful, but it’s not the solution for everything.”

Citation: Architect – The Magazine of the American Institute of Architects

Ashley G. // Editor SMC