What Hollywood finally got right about science

Stainless, Steel, Sustainability

 

Hollywood has continually been cited for incorrectly depicting science in their movies; for example X-men’s fast speed genetic mutation that scientists pose would likely take millions of years of subtle changes, The Avengers franchise’s attempt to convince us of how nuclear radiation causes superpowers, and the infamous ‘light-speed’ concept from the Star Wars franchise.

starwars

However, one unlikely movie stands alone in presenting factual science – Angels and Demons. One character, whilst trying to explain why she withheld the albeit non-factual dangerous technology, described the failings of the sustainable energy market.

Layout 1

 

“Commercialism was critical for the success of any new energy resource…or be vilified by politics and PR fiascoes that had killed nuclear and solar power. Nuclear had proliferated before it was safe….solar had proliferated before it was efficient”.

 

Despite the endless benefits of renewable energy, it has yet to gain any reputable market share in the energy sector. So what is even more unlikely solution? Stainless steel.

According to World-Stainless, stainless steel would take, biofuel, nuclear and solar power to more sustainable and efficient heights.The production of biofuel involves corrosive processes, which require most of the tanks and pipes to be made from stainless steel.

Série thématique : La stratégie de Lisbonne

Stainless steel components is used in all stages of the nuclear cycle, contributing to the safe and reliable production of nuclear energy.

nuclear

With solar power, stainless steel tanks for molten salt offer a heat storage system for solar farms that allows solar heat to be kept for 10—15 hours.

solar

 

Subsequently, stainless steel is instrumental in solving today’s biggest challenge: emission-free production of electrical energy.

Shanghai Metal Corporation (SMC) is committed to the sustainable production of value added stainless steel products used in these processes.

For more information,about SMC, check out our websiteLinkedInTwitter, and Facebook.

Sources: WorldStainlessPlanet Ivy

Advertisements

In Economic Turmoil, Environment Remains Key

Stainless, Steel, Sustainability

Even during periods of economic turmoil, the environment remains a key issue for our world.

P3UgpET

 

By 2050, it is estimated that there will be two billion more people living in the world’s cities which, according to experts, will mean that world construction will grow by more than 70% and reach $15 trillion by 2025, outpacing global GDP. Part of the solution is to build with steel – 50% of steel is used in construction. With four people per house, this will mean providing 1,427 homes every hour, with most of them needed in Asia and Africa. How can such growth be made sustainable?

As most people are aware, steel is used in so many important applications, from bridges and other large constructions, trains and rail lines to industrial machinery, housing, offices, hospitals, cars, buses and bicycles, to name but a few examples. Steel delivers a number of unique environmental benefits, such as product longevity, recyclability, easy transportation and less raw material wastage. In addition, steel offers architectural and design flexibility due to its inherent strength, which allows large span distances and curves to be easily incorporated into designs.

Perhaps best of all, steel is 100% recyclable, without losing any of its properties or strength, and thus reducing the solid waste stream, which results in saved landfill space and the conservation of natural resources. Indeed, more steel is recycled each day than any other material. Even better, the steel industry as a whole has dramatically improved its energy efficiency over the past 30 years, cutting energy consumption by 50% per tonne of steel produced and substantially reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, also per tonne of steel.

The industry is always looking for ways to improve, and to that end a project is in place in the United States that explores the possibility of replacing carbon with hydrogen in blast furnaces. In addition, ULCOS, which stands for Ultra–Low Carbon Dioxide(CO2) Steelmaking, is a consortium of 48 European companies and organisations from 15 European countries that have launched a co-operative research and development initiative to enable drastic reduction in CO2 emissions from steel production. The consortium consists of all major EU steel companies, energy and engineering partners, research institutes and universities and is supported by the European Commission. The aim of the ULCOS programme is to reduce today’s CO2 emissions by at least 50%.

From a human health perspective, steel frames have proven ideal for the ‘healthy home’ concept. The incidence of asthma and sensitivity to chemicals is on the increase and steel frames have been used to achieve allergen-free and dust-free interiors. This requires techniques such as special sealing around windows, moisture barrier systems in the walls, extensive insulation, and whole house ventilation systems. Steel frames retain their original dimensions, which is a major factor in maintaining effective long-term sealing.

Steel is already being used to help manufacture lighter, more fuel-efficient vehicles as well as renewable energy infrastructure including wind turbines, solar installations, smart electric grids and energy-efficient housing and commercial buildings. Its economic benefits include its quick construction off-site, which means less site disturbance and waste, more usable floor space, e.g. thinner floors allowing for more stories in a building, the flexibility to re-configure buildings and steel has a long life with low maintenance, plus energy efficiency for lower operating costs.

Sited: WorldSteel

Ashley G. // Editor SMC

What Makes Stainless Steel a Sustainable Material?

Stainless, Steel, Sustainability

Sustainable

 

People

The material, in its use or in its production process, respects
the human being, especially in terms of health and safety.
A sustainable material does not harm the people working
to produce it, or the people who handle it during its use,
recycling and ultimate disposal.
Stainless steel is not harmful to people during either its
production or use. A protective layer forms naturally on all
stainless steels because of the inclusion of chromium. The
passive layer protects the steel from corrosion – ensuring a
long life. As long as the correct grade of stainless is selected
for an application, the steel remains inert and harmless to the
people who handle it and the environment.
These characteristics have made stainless steel the primary
material in medical, food processing, household and catering
applications.

Planet

The emission footprints of the material, especially those related
to carbon, water and air, are minimised. Reuse and recyclability
are at high levels. The material has low maintenance costs and
a long life, both key indicators that the impact of the material
on the planet is at the lowest levels possible.
The electric arc furnace (EAF), the main process used to
make stainless steels, is extremely efficient. An EAF has a low
impact on the environment in terms of both CO2 and other
emissions. The EAF is also extremely efficient at processing
scrap stainless, ensuring that new stainless steel has an
average recycled content of more than 60%.
Stainless steels are easily recycled to produce more stainless
steels and this process can be carried on indefinitely. It is
estimated that about 80% of stainless steels are recycled at
the end of their life. As stainless steel has a high intrinsic
value, it is collected and recycled without any economic
incentives from the public purse.

Profit

The industries producing the material show long-term
sustainability and growth, provide excellent reliability and
quality for their customers, and ensure a solid and reliable
supply-chain to the end consumer.
Choosing the right stainless steel grade for an application
ensures that it will have low maintenance costs, a long life and
be easy to recycle at the end of that life. This makes stainless an
economical choice in consumer durables (such as refrigerators
and washing machines) and in capital goods applications (such
as transportation, chemical and process applications).
Stainless steels also have better mechanical properties than
most metals. Its fire and corrosion resistance make stainless
a good choice in transportation, building or public works such
as railways, subways, tunnels and bridges. These properties,
together with stainless steel’s mechanical behaviour, are of
prime importance in these applications to ensure human
beings are protected and maintenance costs are kept low.
Stainless also has an aesthetically pleasing appearance,
making it the material of choice in demanding architectural
and design projects.

Taking into account its recyclability, reuse, long life, low
maintenance and product safety, the emissions from the
production and use of stainless steels are minimal when
compared to any other alternative material. A detailed and
precise analysis of the sustainability of stainless steel makes
the choice of stainless a logical one. This might explain why,
as society and governments are becoming more conscious of
environmental and economic factors, the growth in the use of
stainless steel has been the highest of any material in the world.

Sited: WorldStainless

Ashley G. // Editor SMC

An Industry Built On Innovation

Packaging, Stainless, Steel, Sustainability

Steel Packaging

 

Steel Can
The steel can was invented more than 200 years ago.

Cans were first used as containers for food during the Napoleonic wars. The idea for preserving food by heating it in containers was developed by Nicolas Appert. He used glass jars, which were sent to French troops on the Russian front. In 1810, British merchant Peter Durand was granted the patent for a method of preserving food and other perishable items using vessels made of various materials, including steel.

Not surprisingly, food safety is still one of the most important benefits of canned food packaging.

However, food storage is only one of the many applications of steel packaging.

Steel packaging is durable, tamper-resistant and convenient. It is also ‘shelf-stable’, meaning that it can protect the contents from deterioration for a long time. In addition to these attributes, the steel used in packaging also has an aesthetic function. After all, packaging is designed not only to store the product but also to advertise it to the consumer.

An industry built on innovation

In some countries, steel cans are also referred to as tin cans or simply tins. There are thousands of applications, from the familiar soft drink can to unusually-shaped paint tins that are easy to hold in one hand and retro designer biscuit tins. Steel packaging is used for:

  • Food
  • Beverages
  • Promotional materials
  • Aerosols
  • Paints and chemicals
  • Bottle tops and caps

The majority of steel used in packaging is tinplate, which is steel that has been coated with a layer of tin to prevent corrosion. Although tinplate only accounts for around 1% of steel production, it is a highly visible and dynamic industry. Brands and products compete for consumers’ attention on the shelves of supermarkets and other retailers.

The manufacturing processes used in steel packaging are high-tech and sophisticated. Commercial production began in 1812, in a canning factory near London that supplied food to the British army. In 1846, cans were manufactured at the rate of 60 an hour. Modern can-makers can produce up to 1,000 cans a minute.

Once the steel is coated with tin, the tinplate can be coated with polymer, lacquered and printed. The final result is an attractive, safe and functional product.

Highly recyclable

Steel holds a unique position as a sustainable packaging material because it is 100% recyclable. Steel cans are the most recycled form of packaging. A significant proportion of all the steel in a can comes from recycled sources.

 

Cited: World Steel

Ashley G. // Editor SMC

New Times Call For New Solutions

Stainless, Steel, Sustainability

LCA

It is time the world starts to look at the larger picture.  The following facts may lead you to question yourself or someone else during your next decision phase. We must remember that costs are not only those we see in the direct manufacturing of a product but also hidden in the use and recycling phases.

Key facts:

  • Life cycle assessment (LCA) is vital for the future. Environmental regulations that only regulate one phase (the use phase) of a product’s life cycle can create unintended consequences, such as increased CO2 emissions.
  • One example of this is vehicle exhaust or tail pipe regulations which encourage the use of low density materials which are more CO2intensive to produce.
  • LCA considers production, manufacture, the use phase and end-of-life recycling and disposal. Life cycle thinking leads to immediate environmental benefit.
  • In addition to CO2, LCA assesses other impacts such as resource consumption, energy demand and acidification.
  • LCA is easy to implement, cost effective and produces affordable and beneficial solutions for material decision-making and product design.
  • Worldsteel developed one of the first global sector databases for life cycle inventory data and invests to keep it current.

 

Cited: World Steel

Ashley G. // Editor SMC